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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp 747–750 | Cite as

Sulphinpyrazone and renal function following myocardial infarction

  • S. L. Choudhury
  • S. H. Taylor
  • G. Wieringa
  • R. Swaminathan
  • D. B. Morgan
Originals
  • 16 Downloads

Summary

The effects of sulphinpyrazone 800 mg daily on renal excretory function were studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised trial of incremental and full doses of the drug in 28 patients with plasma urea concentration <10 mmol/l in the period 2–28 days following uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction. Sulphinpyrazone in both dosage regimens increased uric acid excretion and lowered plasma urate concentration. There was no evidence that the drug reduced glomerular filtration rate or damaged the renal tubules. These results suggest that sulphinpyrazone in the doses used in this study is not contraindicated in patients early after acute myocardial infarction even though they may have a moderate rise in the blood urea.

Key words

sulphinpyrazone myocardial infarction renal function uric acid excretion prognostic implications 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Choudhury
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. H. Taylor
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Wieringa
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Swaminathan
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. B. Morgan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University Departments of Cardiovascular Studies and Chemical PathologyLeedsEngland
  2. 2.Department of Medical CardiologyThe General InfirmaryLeedsEngland

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