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European Radiology

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 215–220 | Cite as

Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty in patients with solitary kidney

  • Federico Maspes
  • Stefano Profili
  • Luciano Lupattelli
  • Francesco Barzi
  • Ettore Squillaci
  • Luca Innocenzi
  • Giovanni Simonetti
Original Articles Interventional Radiology
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

We report our experience with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of renal arteries (PTRA) in solitary kidney patients. Our series includes 31 patients (mean age: 52 years). 7 with solitary kidney following surgical nephrectomy and 24 with functioning solitary kidney. PTR indicated in presence of stenoses ranging from 60–95 % of vessel lumen. Procedure, with 29 patients were technically successful and mean values for stenosis dropped from 77 % to 33 %. In order to assess the results technically, changes in arterial blood pressure (according to Martin's classification) and creatinine levels were considered. Of 25 followed-up patients, 13 were cured (52%), 8 improved (32%),and 4 were unchanged (16%%). Complications were observed during procedures in five patients (16. 1 % ), superimposing that of nonsolitary kidney patients. Good revasculariiation, reduction of blood pressure, preservation or even improvement of renal function and low complications, make PTRA the best procedure with solitary kidney patients.

Keywords

Solitary kidney renovascular hypertension percutaneous angioplasty 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Federico Maspes
    • 1
  • Stefano Profili
    • 1
  • Luciano Lupattelli
    • 2
  • Francesco Barzi
    • 2
  • Ettore Squillaci
    • 1
  • Luca Innocenzi
    • 1
  • Giovanni Simonetti
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of RadiologyUniversity of Rome “Tor Vergata,” S. Eugenio HospitalRomeItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Radiology, Policlinico MonteluceUniversity of PerugiaItaly

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