Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 341, Issue 3, pp 257–270 | Cite as

Normal spontaneous activity of the pyeloureteral system in the guinea-pig

  • K. Golenhofen
  • J. Hannappel
Article

Summary

  1. 1.

    The normal ureteral peristalsis of the guinea-pig was determined by long-term recordings of electrical activity in the unanaesthetized animal. The frequency distribution of peristaltic period durations is multimodal. The normal basic frequency is 6/min, calculated from the first mode. Great variations in the manifest frequency of peristalsis are observed, caused mainly by multiplications of the basic period duration.

     
  2. 2.

    In isolated preparations, the normal in situ activity can only be imitated if some of the utmost renal ends of the renal pelvis are included. The normal pacemaker could be localized in these most proximal ends of the renal pelvis, as shown also through clamping and ligature experiments. The effect of stretch on the basic frequency of the normal pacemaker is negligible, as well as the effect of catecholamines. Tetrodotoxin 3·10−6 has no effect, indicating that the pacemaker process is myogenic.

     
  3. 3.

    A theory for the pacemaker process is derived: several subunits of similar potencies are acting in parallel with the tendency towards synchronization; this action can be described as a cooperation of multiple coupled oscillators.

     

Key words

Smooth Muscle Ureteral Peristalsis Pacemaker Process Spontaneous Activity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Golenhofen
    • 1
  • J. Hannappel
    • 1
  1. 1.Physiologisches Institut der Universität MarburgGermany

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