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Social psychiatry

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 119–122 | Cite as

Self-other differentiation: a cross-culturally invariant characteristic of mental patients

  • E. B. Foa
  • B. B. Chatterjee
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Summary

Perception of behavior toward self and toward significant others was studied in mental patients from three cultures and compared to normals' from the same culture. It was found that differentiation between self and other was lower for patients than for normals, the difference being greater for schizophrenics than for mildly disturbed individuals.

Keywords

Public Health Invariant Characteristic Mental Patient Disturbed Individual 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. B. Foa
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. B. Chatterjee
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Temple University Medical SchoolPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Gandhian Institute of StudiesIndia

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