Advertisement

Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 385, Issue 2, pp 147–153 | Cite as

Effects of a mild weight-lifting program on the progress of glucocorticoid-induced atrophy in rat hindlimb muscles

  • Phillip F. Gardiner
  • Bonnie Hibl
  • D. R. Simpson
  • Roland Roy
  • V. Reggie Edgerton
Heart, Circulation, Respiration and Blood; Environmental and Exercise Physiology

Abstracts

The effect of a mild weight-lifting program on the progress of glucocorticoid-induced atrophy was investigated. Groups of rats were either injected daily for 6 weeks with triamcinolone acetonide, 1 mg/kg (group S), subjected to a weight-lifting program 4 times per week (group T), or subjected to the injection and weight-lifting programs concurrently (group ST). The traningng program, besides decreasing the normal body weight gain of control (group C) rats, had no effects on gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In group ST, the extent of gastrocnemius atrophy was less severe than in group S, and the mean areas of all fiber types were greater in similar proportion. Gastrocnemius muscles were also tetanically stronger (g, g/g body weight) in group ST than group S. The soleus muscles of groups ST and S were similar in all indices of size and strength, except for a significantly decreased fast-twitsch-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) mean fiber area in the ST seleus muscles. The extent of fast-twitsch muscle atrophy resulting from chronic glucocorticoid treatment can be lessened by mild weight-lifting exercise. Differences in fiber area responses between soleus and gastrocnemius may reflect recruitment and/or metabolic differences of similar fiber types in the two muscles.

Key words

Atrophy Glucocorticoids Muscle overload Hypertrophy Exercise training 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bullock, G., White, A., Worthington, J.: The effects of catabolic and anabolic steroids on amino acid incorporation by skeletal muscle ribosomes. Biochem. J.108, 417–424 (1968)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bullock, G., Carter, E., Elliot, P., Peters, R., Simpson P., White, A.: Relative changes in the function of muscle ribosomes and mitochondria during the early phase of steroid-induced catabolism. Biochem. J.127, 881–892 (1972)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Edgerton, V. R.: Neuromuscular adaptation to power and endorance work. Can. J. Appl. Sport Sci.1, 49–58 (1976)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Edgerton, V. R., Barnard, R., Peter, J., Maier, A., Simpson, D.: Properties of immobilized hindlimb muscles in theGalago senegalensis. Exp. Neurol.46, 115–131 (1975)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gardiner, P. F., Edgerton, V. R.: Contractile responses of rat fast and slow muscles to glucocorticoid treatment. Muscle and Nerve2, 274–281 (1979)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gardiner, P. F., Botterman, B. R., Eldred, E., Simpson, D. R., Edgerton, V. R.: Metabolic and contractile changes in fast and slow muscles of the cat after glucocorticoid-induced atrophy. Exp. Neurol.62, 241–255 (1978)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Gardiner, P. F., Montanaro, G., Simpson, D. R., Edgerton, V. R.: Effects of glucocorticoid treatment and food restriction on rat hindlimb muscles. Am. J. Physiol. (in press, 1980)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Goldberg, A.: Work-induced growth of skeletal muscle in normal and hypophysectomized rats. Am. J. Physiol.213, 1193–1198 (1967)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Goldberg, A.: Protein synthesis during work-induced growth of skeletal muscle. J. Cell. Biol.36, 653–658 (1968)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Goldberg, A.: Protein turnover in skeletal muscle. I. Protein catabolism during work-induced hypertrophy and growth induced with growth hormone. J. Biol. Chem.244, 3217–3222 (1969)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Goldberg, A.: Protein turnover in skeletal muscle. II. Effects of denervation and cortisone on protein catabolism in skeletal muscle. J. biol. Chem.244, 3223–3229 (1969)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Goldberg, A., Goodman, H.: Relationship between cortisone and muscle work in determining muscle size. J. Physiol. (Lond.)200, 667–675 (1969)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Goldberg, A., Goldspink, D.: Influence of food deprivation and adrenal steooids on DNA synthesis in various mammalian tissues. Am. J. Physiol.228, 310–317 (1975)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Goldberg, A., Etlinger, J., Goldspink, D., Jablecki, C.: Mechanism of work-induced hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. Med. Sci. Sports7, 248–261 (1975)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Goldspink, G.: The combined effects of exercise and reduced food intake on skeletal muscle fibers. J. Cell. Comp. Physiol.63, 209–216 (1964)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Guth, L., Samaha, F.: Qualitative differences between actomyosin ATPase of slow and fast mammalian muscle. Exp. Neurol.25, 138–152 (1969)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Li, J., Goldberg, E.: Effects of food deprivation on protein synthesis and degradation in rat skeletal muscles. Am. J. Physiol.231, 441–448 (1976)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Maclean, K., Shurr, P.: Reversible amyotrophy complicating treatment with fluorocortisone. Lancet1959 I, 701–703Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Maier, A., Crockett J., Simpson, D., Saubert, C., Edgerton, V. R.: Properties of immobilized guinea pig hindlimb muscles. Am. J. Physiol.231, 1520–1526 (1976)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Murphy, R., Beardsley A.: Mechanical properties of the cat soleus muscle in situ. Am. J. Physiol.227, 1008–1013 (1974)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Novikoff, A., Shin, W., Drucker, J.: Mitochondrial localization of oxidative enzymes: staining results with two tetrazolium salts. J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol.9, 47–61 (1961)Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Peter, J., Barnard, R., Edgerton, V., Gillespie, A., Stempel, K.: Metabolic profiles of three fiber types of skeletal muscle in guinea pigs and rabbits. Biochemistry11, 2627–2633 (1972)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Shoji, S., Pennington, R.: The effect of cortisone on protein breakdown and synthesis in rat skeletal muscle. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol.6, 159–169 (1977)Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Sobel, B., Kaufman, S.: Enhanced RNA polymerase activity in skeletal muscle undergoing hypertrophy. Arch. Biochem. Biophys.137, 469–476 (1970)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Spamer, C., Pette, D.: Activity patterns of phosphofructokinase, glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in microdissected fast and slow fibers from rabbit psoas and soleus muscle. Histochemistry52, 201–216 (1977)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Stone, M., Lipner, H.: Responses to intensive training and methandrostenelone administration I. Contractile and performance variables. Pflügers Arch.375, 141–146 (1978)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Thorstensson, A.: Muscle strength, fibre types and enzyme activities in man. Acta Physiol. Scand., Suppl. 443 (1976)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Tice, L., Engel, E.: The effects of glucocorticoids on red and white muscles in the rat. Am. J. Pathol.50, 311–332 (1967)Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Vignos, P., Greene, R.: Oxidative respiration of skeletal muscle in experimental corticosteroid myopathy. J. Lab. Clin. Med.81, 365–378 (1973)Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Vignos, P., Kirby, A., Marsalis, P.: Contractile properties of rabbit fast and slow muscles in steroid myopathy. Exp. Neurol.53, 444–453 (1976)Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Walsh, G., Devivo, D., Olson, W.: Histochemical and ultrastructural changes in rat muscle. Occurrence following adrenal corticotrophic hormone, glucocorticoids, and starvation. Arch. Neurol.24, 83–93 (1971)Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Wattenberg, L., Leong, J.: Effects of coenzyme Q10 and menadione on succinate dehydrogenase activity as measured by tetrazolium salt reaction. J. Histochem. Cytochem.8, 269–303 (1960)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip F. Gardiner
    • 2
  • Bonnie Hibl
    • 1
  • D. R. Simpson
    • 1
  • Roland Roy
    • 1
  • V. Reggie Edgerton
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuromuscular Research Laboratory and Department of KinesiologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Département d'éducation physiqueUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada

Personalised recommendations