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Neuroradiology

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 524–526 | Cite as

Reversible MRI and CT findings in uremic encephalopathy

  • J. Okada
  • K. Yoshikawa
  • H. Matsuo
  • K. Kanno
  • M. Oouchi
Case Reports

Summary

In this 35-year-old woman with chronic glomerulonephritis and uremic encephalopathy, the basal ganglia bilaterally, internal capsules and periventricular white matter showed hypodensity on CT, low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. Following a series of dialyses, her clinical symptoms and blood chemistry improved. The CT and MRI returned to normal. These reversible abnormalities may be caused by reversible ischemic change, but disorders of cerebral metabolism and uremic toxins may contribute.

Key words

Magnetic resonance imaging Computed tomography Uremic encephalopathy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Okada
    • 1
  • K. Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • H. Matsuo
    • 2
  • K. Kanno
    • 2
  • M. Oouchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyChiba University School of MedicineChibaJapan
  2. 2.Namiki ClinicHonda Memorial HospitalKooriyamaJapan

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