Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 361, Issue 3, pp 221–229 | Cite as

Vasoconstrictor and pilomotor fibres in skin nerves to the cat's tail

  • Michael Grosse
  • Wilfrid Jänig
Article

Summary

Postganglionic neurones to the tail's skin of the cat were investigated with regard to their spontaneous activity, response characteristics to somatic stimuli and asphyxia, the conduction velocity of their axons, and the conduction velocity of the preganglionic axons converging on them. The cats were anaesthetized with chloralose, immobilized, and arteficially ventilated. With this regimen the postganglionic neurones were divided into two types: 1. Type 1 neurones are spontaneously active and exhibit reflexes upon somatic stimulation. During asphyxia they are mostly first depressed and then excited for about 2–3 min. Their axons conduct with 0.57±0.13 m/s (mean ± SD). The preganglionic axons converging on them conduct with 5.4±1.6 m/s. 2. Type 2 neurones are not spontaneously active and exhibit with few exceptions no reflexes on somatic stimuli. During asphyxia they are activated after 3–4 min, concomitantly with piloerection, when the activity in type 1 neurones is already decreasing. Their axons conduct with 0.84±0.14 m/s, the preganglionic axons converging on them conduct with 9.9±2.9 m/s. 3. From these characteristics it is concluded that type 1 neurones have vasomotor function and most type 2 neurones pilomotor function.

Key words

Vasoconstrictors Pilomotors Tail's skin Single unit analysis Cat 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Grosse
    • 1
  • Wilfrid Jänig
    • 1
  1. 1.Physiologisches Institut der UniversitätKielGermany

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