Virchows Archiv A

, Volume 398, Issue 1, pp 67–73 | Cite as

Synovial sarcoma enzyme histochemistry of a typical case

  • Roberto Pisa
  • Franco Bonetti
  • Marco Chilosi
  • Antonio Iannucci
  • Fabio Menestrina
Article

Summary

A typical case of biphasic synovial sarcoma was studied using enzyme histochemistry. A marked difference between the staining characteristics of the spindle cells and the epithelial-like cells was demonstrated by reactions for various hydrolytic enzymes. The epithelial-like cells exhibited a strong reactivity for alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, adenosine triphosphatase and nonspecific esterase, whereas spindle-cells were completely unreactive when tested for these enzymes.

This is, to our knowledge, the first report demonstrating differences in the enzymatic pattern of the two cell populations which compose synovial sarcoma.

Key words

Synovial sarcoma Enzyme histochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Pisa
    • 1
  • Franco Bonetti
    • 1
  • Marco Chilosi
    • 1
  • Antonio Iannucci
    • 1
  • Fabio Menestrina
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Anatomia e Istologia PatologicaUniversita' di PadovaVeronaItaly

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