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Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 403, Issue 1, pp 35–40 | Cite as

Effects of SITS on urate transport by isolated, perfused snake renal tubules

  • Suniti K. Mukherjee
  • William H. Dantzler
Transport Processes, Metabolism and Endocrinology; Kidney, Gastrointestinal Tract, and Exocrine Glands

Abstract

Effects of an inhibitor of membrane anion-exchange transport processes, 4-acetamido-4′-isothiocyano-2,2′-disulfonic stilbene (SITS), on urate transport by isolated, perfused snake (Thamnophis spp.) proximal renal tubules were studied. SITS (10−4 mol/l) in the luminal perfusate had absolutely no effect on net urate secretion (J urate net ) or on net fluid absorption (Jv). This observation is compatible with other data that give no support to the concept of a mediated transport step for urate from the cells to the lumen. SITS (10−4 mol/l) in the bathing medium reversibly inhibitedJ urate net without affectingJv. At the time of maximum inhibition ofJ urate net , the concentration of urate in the cell water was increased and the apparent permeability of the luminal membrane to urate was decreased, but the urate efflux across the peritubular membrane and the apparent permeability of the peritubular membrane to urate were unchanged. There was no evidence of significant intracellular binding or trapping of urate. Although an increase in the initial rate of urate transport into the cells across the peritubular membrane could not be demonstrated conclusively in nonperfused tubules, the results still suggest that SITS in the bathing medium may inhibitJ urate net by inhibiting urate movement from the cells to the lumen while actually enhancing transport from the bathing medium into the cells.

Key words

Urate transport SITS Isolated renal tubules Comparative physiology Garter snakes (Thamnophis spp.) 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suniti K. Mukherjee
    • 1
  • William H. Dantzler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, College of MedicineUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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