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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 59, Issue 1, pp 35–43 | Cite as

Bioenergetic consequences of glucoamylase production in carbon-limited chemostat cultures ofAspergillus niger

  • M. Metwally
  • M. el Sayed
  • M. Osman
  • P. P. F. Hanegraaf
  • A. H. Stouthamer
  • H. W. van Verseveld
Article

Abstract

Aspergillus niger has been grown in glucose- and maltose-limited continuous cultures to determine the bioenergetic consequences of the production of the extracellular enzyme glucoamylase. Growth yields (g biomass per mol substrate) were high, indicating that growth was very efficient and protein production for biomass was not exceedingly energy consuming. It has been found that the energy costs for the production of this extracellular enzyme is very high. Depending on the efficiency of energy conservation the glucoamylase protein yield on ATP is between 1.3 and 2.6 g protein per mol ATP, which is equal or less than 10% of the theoretical maximum of 25.5. These high energy costs most probably have to be invested in the process of excretion. A comparison between an industrial over-producing strain and the wild typeAspergillus niger showed that this over-producing strain most probably is a regulatory mutant. Two regions of specific growth rates could be determined (one at specific growth rates lower and one at specific growth rates higher than 0.1 h-1), which are characterized by differences in mycelium morphology and a significant deviation from linearity in the linear equation for substrate utilization. Analysis of the region of specific growth rates higher than 0.1 h-1 yielded maintenance requirements of virtual zero. It has been concluded that for a good analysis of the growth behaviour of filamentour fungi the linear equation for substrate utilization is not suitable, since it contains no term for the process of differentiation.

Key words

Aspergillus continuous culture fungi protein production 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Metwally
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. el Sayed
    • 2
  • M. Osman
    • 2
  • P. P. F. Hanegraaf
    • 1
  • A. H. Stouthamer
    • 1
  • H. W. van Verseveld
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Biological LaboratoryVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Botany Department, Faculty of SciencesTanta UniversityTantaEgypt

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