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Social psychiatry

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 11–17 | Cite as

Psychological symptoms and social supports

  • Michel Silberfeld
Originals

Summary

Evidence is given for the hypothesis of Miller and Ingham (1976) that psychological symptom levels are moderated by the presence of social supports. Psychiatric and family practice out-patients were found to differ markedly in the social network they participated in, with psychiatric patients showing themselves to be relatively impoverished. A survey method for reconstructing an economy of time spent in interpersonal relationships was used as a measure of social network.

Keywords

Public Health Social Support Social Network Interpersonal Relationship Psychiatric Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel Silberfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.Addiction Research FoundationTorontoCanada

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