Urinary excretion of lead and mercury after oral administration ofmeso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid in patients with motor neurone disease

  • Elisabeth S. Louwerse
  • Jean-Pierre Buchet
  • Maria A. Van Dijk
  • Vianney J. M. B. de Jong
  • Robert R. Lauwerys
Short Communication

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders involving motor neurones. The aetiology of the non-familial forms is still unknown but it has been suggested that long-term exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury may play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In 53 patients suffering from ALS (n = 42) and SMA (n = 9) the oral administration of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, 20 mg/kg) did not result in a greater mobilization of lead and mercury from peripheral depots than in control subjects. Although it cannot be excluded that the amount of lead or mercury excreted after DMSA administration may not be a reflection of the amount accumulated in the motor neurones, this study does not provide support for the hypothesis that heavy metals play a significant role in the occurrence of motor neurone diseases.

Key words

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Spinal muscular dystrophy Lead Mercury Dimercaptosuccinic acid 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth S. Louwerse
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Buchet
    • 2
  • Maria A. Van Dijk
    • 1
  • Vianney J. M. B. de Jong
    • 1
  • Robert R. Lauwerys
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of NeurologyAcademic Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Industrial and Occupational Medicine Unit, School of Public HealthCatholic University of LouvainBrusselsBelgium

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