Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 256–258 | Cite as

Effect of L-leucine on oral melphalan kinetics in patients

  • Phillip A. Reece
  • Barry M. Dale
  • Raymond G. Morris
  • Dusan Kotasek
  • David Gee
  • Stephen Rogerson
Original Articles L-Leucine, Melphalan Kinetics

Summary

Melphalan uptake in the intestine has recently been shown to be an energy-dependent process which is affected by metabolic inhibitors. It is therefore theoretically possible that amino acids in food could reduce melphalan absorption by competing for uptake at the sites of absorption in the intestine. Since L-leucine has been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of melphalan transport into cells in vitro, this amino acid was chosen for the present study in patients. Oral melphalan (4.5±0.5 mg/m2) was given to ten fasting patients with and without a 2-g oral dose of L-leucine on separate randomized occasions at least 1 week apart. Melphalan plasma levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for 5-h after dosing. L-Leucine plasma levels were measured by HPLC before and at 1 h after dosing. The area under the curve for melphalan was lower in seven of the patients after L-leucine. Plasma L-leucine levels 1 h after melphalan administration were 15.4±3.7 μg/ml fasting and 35.4±5.2 μg/ml after L-leucine. The results indicate that L-leucine can reduce plasma melphalan levels in some patients, probably through a reduction in absorption of the drug from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the effect, like that of food, is highly variable.

Keywords

Liquid Chromatography Cancer Research Plasma Level Melphalan Gastrointestinal Tract 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip A. Reece
    • 1
  • Barry M. Dale
    • 2
  • Raymond G. Morris
    • 1
  • Dusan Kotasek
    • 2
  • David Gee
    • 3
  • Stephen Rogerson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PharmacologyThe Queen Elizabeth HospitalAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Haematology-OncologyThe Queen Elizabeth HospitalAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Clinical ChemistryThe Queen Elizabeth HospitalAdelaideAustralia

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