Acta Diabetologica

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 169–172 | Cite as

Effects of non-esterified fatty acids on insulin-stimulated glucose transport in isolated skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

  • D. Galuska
  • L. Nolte
  • E. Wahlström
  • J. Smedegaard Kristensen
  • H. Wallberg-Henriksson
  • J. R. Zierath
Originals

Abstract

The influence of elevated levels of oleate on insulin-stimulated 3-0-methylglucose transport was assessed in vitro, in isolated skeletal muscle obtained from patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (n=7) and control subjects (n=8). An increase in oleate levels from 0.3 to 1.0 mmol/l induced a 3.7-fold increase in the rate of oleate oxidation (P<0.001) in skeletal muscle from control subjects. However, the rate of insulinstimulated 3-0-methylglucose transport was not altered in isolated skeletal muscle from the control subjects or the type 2 diabetic patients following exposure to 1.0 mmol/l oleate. This observation indicates that elevation of nonesterified fatty acids to a high physiological level has no inhibitory effect on glucose transport.

Key words

Glucose transport Human skeletal muscle Non-esterified fatty acids Insulin action Insulin resistance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Galuska
    • 1
  • L. Nolte
    • 1
  • E. Wahlström
    • 1
  • J. Smedegaard Kristensen
    • 2
  • H. Wallberg-Henriksson
    • 1
  • J. R. Zierath
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PhysiologyKarolinska Hospital, Karolinska InstituteStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Diabetes ResearchNovo Research InstituteBagsvaerdDenmark

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