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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 538–545 | Cite as

Composition of the triacylglycerols of the seeds of some representatives of the family labiatae

  • T. V. Panekina
  • S. D. Gusakova
  • E. M. Zalevskaya
  • A. U. Umarov
Article

Abstract

The fatty acid compositions of five species and the compositions of the triacylglycerols of 22 species of the family labiatae have been studied for the first time. Octadeca-ε12,13-dienoic acid has been detected in five species. The typical compositions of the triacylglycerols differs from those of known plant oils with a similar set of fatty acids by the absence of triacylglycerols of the S3 type and the presence of the S2U type (0.1–1.6%). The main types are SU2 (5–24%) and U3 (74–95%). In a comparison of the position-species composition of the oils studied it was found that the oils of the plants of this family are distinguished by a greater diversity of species of triacylglycerols and also by the nature of the distribution of the unsaturated acyl residues between the 1,3- and 2-positions. In the majority of oils studied, the 2- position is enriched with the 18:1 acid, while the 18:2 acid is distributed predominantly in the 1,3- positions, and the nature of the distribution of the 18:3 acid is determined by its proportion in the total.

Keywords

Linolenic Acid Saturated Acid Unsaturated Acid Selectivity Factor Dienoic Acid 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. V. Panekina
  • S. D. Gusakova
  • E. M. Zalevskaya
  • A. U. Umarov

There are no affiliations available

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