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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 617–619 | Cite as

The pharmacokinetics of clotiazepam after oral and sublingual administration to volunteers

  • C. Benvenuti
  • V. Bottà
  • M. Broggini
  • V. Gambaro
  • F. Lodi
  • M. Valenti
Short Communications

Summary

We have studied the single dose pharmacokinetics of 5 mg clotiazepam drops, oral tablets, and sublingual tablets in a cross-over study in 6 healthy volunteers (median age 28 years). The formulations had similar systemic availability.

Compared with oral tablets the sublingual route gave a lower peak concentration and a delayed peak time, while drops gave a greater maximum concentration with a similar peak time.

The use of drops is suggested for a more marked initial effect and the sublingual route for easier administration, especially in the elderly.

Key words

clotiazepam pharmacokinetics healthy volunteers 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Benvenuti
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • V. Bottà
    • 2
  • M. Broggini
    • 2
  • V. Gambaro
    • 3
  • F. Lodi
    • 3
  • M. Valenti
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Department, Pharmaceutical DevelopmentFormentiMilanItaly
  2. 2.Medicine DepartmentHospital “F.del Ponte”VareseItaly
  3. 3.Department of Forensic Toxicology, Legal Medicine InstituteUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

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