European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 375–379 | Cite as

Blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline during single high-dose beta adrenoceptor blockade

  • T. J. B. Maling
  • A. Ferrara
  • J. C. Mucklow
  • J. L. Reid
  • Carlene A. Hamilton
  • C. T. Dollery
Originals

Summary

The acute effects upon blood pressure and sympathetic outflow of two beta adrenoceptor blocking drugs, propranolol and atenolol, are described in five healthy normotensive subjects. Supine blood pressure, heart rate, plasma noradrenaline, and urinary catecholamine excretion were measured before and at intervals for 24 h after a single oral dose of either propranolol 200 mg, atenolol 100 mg, or placebo. Propranolol caused a fall in blood pressure and heart rate of 17.2/14.1 mm Hg and 20.4 beats/min respectively two hours after dose. Atenolol caused a fall in blood pressure of 11.4/18.6 mm Hg withih 7 h of the dose, and a fall in heart rate of 13.8 beats/min after 2 h. The reduction in blood pressure after single high dose beta adrenoceptor blockade is established. The synchronous reduction in blood pressure and heart rate after propranolol was not associated with an increase in peripheral sympathetic activity as assessed by the biochemical indices. It is conceivable that the reduction in blood pressure during beta adrenoceptor blockade may be due in part to inappropriately low sympathetic activity but this cannot be the main mechanism of pressure reduction.

Key words

propranolol atenolol plasma noradrenaline sympathetic activity blood pressure 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adler-Graschinsky, E., Langer, S. Z.: Possible role of a beta adrenoceptor in the regulation of noradrenaline release by nerve stimulation through a positive feedback mechanism. Br. J. Pharmacol.53, 43–50 (1975)Google Scholar
  2. Bühler, F.R., Laragh, J.H., Baer, L., Vaughan, E.D., Brunner, H.R.: Propranolol inhibition of renin secretion. N. Engl. J. Med.287, 1209–1217 (1972)Google Scholar
  3. Case, D. E.: ICI Pharmaceuticals Division. Personal Communication, 1977Google Scholar
  4. Carter, J. K., Mitchell, H. W., Poyser, R. H.: Comparison of some haemodynamic changes between central and intravenous administration of (±) propranolol in anaesthetised dogs. Br. J. Pharmacol.51, 1, 146P (1974)Google Scholar
  5. Day, M. D., Roach, A. G.: Adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system of the cat concerned with control of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Nature242, 30–31 (1973)Google Scholar
  6. Franciosa, J. A., Freis, E. D., Conway, J.: Antihypertensive and haemodynamic properties of the new beta adrenergic blocking agent timolol. Circulation48, 118–124 (1973)Google Scholar
  7. Frohlich, E. D., Tarazi, R. C., Dustan, H. P., Page, I. H.: The paradox of beta adrenergic blockade in hypertension. Circulation37, 417–423 (1968)Google Scholar
  8. Henry, D. P., Starman, B. J., Johnson, B. G., Williams, R. H.: A sensitive radioenzymatic assay for norepinephrine in tissues and plasma. Life Sci.16, 375–384 (1975)Google Scholar
  9. Hökfelt, B., Hedeland, H., Hanson, B. G.: The effect of clonidine and penbutolol respectively on catecholamines in blood and urine, plasma renin activity and urinary aldosterone in hypertensive patients. Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn.213, 307–321 (1975)Google Scholar
  10. Johnsson, G., Guyman, M. de, Bergman, H., Sannerstedt, R.: The haemodynamic effects of alprenolol and propranolol at rest and during exercise in hypertensive patients. Pharmacol. Clin.2, 34–37 (1969)Google Scholar
  11. Michelakis, A. M., McAllister, R. G.: The effect of chronic adrenergic receptor blockade on plasma renin activity in man. J. Clin. Endocrinol.34, 386–394 (1972)Google Scholar
  12. Myers, M. G., Lewis, P. J., Reid, J. L., Dollery, C. T.: Brain concentration of propranolol in relation to hypotensive effect in the rabbit with observations on brain propranolol levels in man. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.192, 327–335 (1975)Google Scholar
  13. Prichard, B. N. C. Hypotensive action of propranolol. Br. Med. J.1964/I, 1227–1228Google Scholar
  14. Prichard, B. N. C., Gillam, P. M. S.: Treatment of hypertension with propranolol. Br. Med. J.1969/I, 7–16Google Scholar
  15. Reid, J. L., Lewis, J. P., Myers, M. G., Dollery, C. T.: Cardiovascular effects of intracerebroventricular d-, 1- and dl-propranolol in the conscious rabbit. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.188, 394–399 (1974)Google Scholar
  16. Tarazi, R. C., Dustan, H. P.: Beta adrenergic blockade in hypertension. Practical and theoretical implications of long-term haemodynamic variations. Am. J. Cardiol.29, 633–640 (1972)Google Scholar
  17. Ulrych, M., Frohlich, E. D., Dustan, H. P., Page, I. H.: Immediate haemodynamic effects of beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol in normotensive and hypertensive man. Circulation37, 411–416 (1968)Google Scholar
  18. von Euler, U. S., Lishajko, F.: Improved technique for the fluorimetric estimation of catecholamines. Acta Physiol. Scand.51, 348–356 (1961)Google Scholar
  19. Wing, L. M. H., Reid, J. L., Hamilton, C. A., Davies, D. S., Dollery, C. T.: The effect of clonidine on biochemical indices of sympathetic function in normotensive subjects. Clin. Sci. Mol. Med.51, 3, 15–16P (1976)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. B. Maling
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Ferrara
    • 1
  • J. C. Mucklow
    • 1
  • J. L. Reid
    • 1
  • Carlene A. Hamilton
    • 1
  • C. T. Dollery
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PharmacologyRoyal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of MedicineWellington Clinical School Wellington HospitalWellington 2New Zealand

Personalised recommendations