Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 28, Issue 3–4, pp 209–222 | Cite as

Evolution of the glycophorin gene family in the hominoid primates

  • Ann Rearden
  • Huan Phan
  • Shinichi Kudo
  • Minoru Fukuda
Article

Abstract

Analysis of nucleotide sequences of the human glycophorin A (GPA) and glycophorin B (GPB) genes has indicated that the GPA gene most closely resembles the ancestral gene, whereas the GPB gene likely arose from the GPA gene by homologous recombination. To study the evolution of the glycophorin gene family in the hominoid primates, restricted DNA on Southern blots from man, pygmy chimpanzee, common chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon was probed with cDNA fragments encoding the human GPA and GPB coding and 3′-untranslated regions. This showed the presence in all of the hominoid primates of at least one GPA-like gene. In addition, at least one GPB-like gene was detected in man, both chimpanzee species, and gorilla, strongly suggesting that the event that produced the GPB gene occurred in the common ancestor of man-chimpanzee-gorilla. An unexpected finding in this study was the conservation ofEcoRI restriction sites relative to those of the other four enzymes used; the significance of this observation is unclear, but raises the question of nonrandomness ofEcoRI restriction sites in noncoding regions. Further analysis of the evolution of this multigene family, including nucleotide sequence analysis, will be useful in clarification of the evolutionary relationships of the hominoid primates, in correlation with the structure and function of the glycophorin molecules, and in assessment of the role of evolution in the autogenicity of glycophorin determinants.

Key words

glycophorin A glycophorin B evolution primates chimpanzee gorilla orangutan gibbon 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Rearden
    • 1
  • Huan Phan
    • 1
  • Shinichi Kudo
    • 2
  • Minoru Fukuda
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, M-012University of California San DiegoLa Jolla
  2. 2.La Jolla Cancer Research FoundationCancer Research CenterLa Jolla

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