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Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 404–408 | Cite as

Secondary structures of friction at the surface of bronze alloyed with tungsten disulfide

  • V. V. Gorskii
  • A. N. Gripachevskii
  • B. M. Krivitskii
  • V. A. Tsitovich
Theory and Technology of Sintering Processes, Thermal, and Chemicothermal Treatment

Abstract

Methods of x-ray microprobe analysis, metallography, and continuous impression of an indentor are used to study secondary structures covering the friction surface of a bronze-tungsten disulfide (VAFC) composite-steel pair. Differences in the structure, composition, and properties of the friction track on a VAFC composite for four stages of testing in air, in a vacuum, in a vacuum with screen cooled by liquid nitrogen, and action of a current are found. It is established that the friction track is narrowest and most homogeneous using action of a current with the use of optimum friction conditions. It differs essentially not only from the initial VAFC phase but also from the initial friction tracks in the first three cases. The friction track material is a chemical compound corresponding in composition to the formula Me2S. It is assumed that the anomalously low friction in this case is due to presence of readily sliding planes in this substance.

Keywords

Nitrogen Tungsten Liquid Nitrogen Secondary Structure Disulfide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. V. Gorskii
    • 1
  • A. N. Gripachevskii
    • 1
  • B. M. Krivitskii
    • 1
  • V. A. Tsitovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Ukranian Academy of SciencesInstitute of Metal PhysicsKiev

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