Advertisement

European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 7, Issue 6, pp 467–471 | Cite as

Disappearance of phenazone from plasma in patients with obstructive jaundice

  • J. Elfström
  • S. Lindgren
Originals

Summary

The influence of obstructive jaundice on the plasma disappearance of phenazone has been studied. The elimination rate of the drug reflects the ability of the liver to hydroxylate it and possibly other drugs, too. A new analytical method based on gas chromatography was used for the determination of phenazone in plasma. The study was performed in 11 patients with jaundice due to stones in the common bile duct, both during the icteric period and three months later, when the obstruction had been relieved and the plasma bilirubin had returned to normal. A separate group, consisting of five patients with jaundice due to malignant disease, was studied only once. The study failed to show a uniform influence of obstructive jaundice on the elimination rate of phenazone. In two other non-icteric patients the excretion of phenazone in bile was found to be less than 2% of the dose administered.

Key words

Phenazone obstructive jaundice plasma elimination drug metabolism biliary excretion 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Aronsson, K. F.: Liver function studies during and after complete extrahepatic biliary obstruction in the dog. Acta chir. scand. suppl. 275 (1961)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Branch, R. A., Herbert, C. M., Read, A. E.: Determinants of serum antipyrine half-lives in patients with liver disease. Gut14, 569 (1973)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Brodie, B. B., Burns, J. J., Weiner, M.: Metabolism of drugs in subjects with Laennec's cirrhosis. Med. Exp.1, 290 (1959)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Carey, J. B.: The serum trihydroxy — dihydroxy bile acid ratio in liver and biliary tract disease. J. clin. Invest.37, 1494 (1958)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Dettli, L., Spring, P.: Factors influencing drug elimination in man. Il Farmaco23, 795 (1968)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ekdahl, P. H.: On the conjugation and formation of bile acids in the human liver. Acta chir. scand.115, 208 (1958)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hutterer, F., Denk, H., Bacchin, P. G., Schenkman, J. B., Schaffner, F., Popper, H.: Mechanism of cholestasis. I. Effect of bile acids on microsomal P-450 dependant biotransformation system in vitro. Life Sci.9, 877 (1970)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Kaltiala, E. H.: The experimental obstructive jaundice and liver microsomal enzymes in rats. Ann. Chir. Gynaec. Fenn.60, 43 (1971)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Levi, A. J., Sherlock, S., Walker, D.: Phenylbutazone and isoniazid metabolism in patients with liver disease in relation to previous drug therapy. Lancet 1968I, 1275Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Levy, G., Ertel, I. J.: Effect of bilirubin on drug conjugation in children. Pediatrics47, 811 (1971)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lindgren, S., Collste, P., Norlander, B., Sjöqvist, F.: Gas chromatographic assessment of the reproducibility of phenazone plasma half-life in young healthy volunteers. Europ. J. clin. Pharmacol. (To be published)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mc Luen, F. F., Fouts, J. R.: The effect of obstructive jaundice on drug metabolism in rabbits. J. Pharmacol. exp. Ther.131, 7 (1961)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Rundle, F. F., Cass, B. B., Robson, B., Middleton, M.: Bile drainage after choledochostomy in man with some observations on bile fistula. Surgery,37, 903 (1955)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Sjöqvist, F., von Bahr, C.: Interindividual differences in drug oxidation: Clinical importance. Drug Metabolism and Disposition1, 469 (1973)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Soberman, R., Brodie, B. B., Levy, B. B., Axelrod, L., Hollander, V., Steele, I. M.: The use of antipyrine in measurement of total body water. J. biol. Chem.179, 31 (1949)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Elfström
    • 1
  • S. Lindgren
    • 1
  1. 1.Surgical Clinic and Department of Clinical PharmacologyUniversity of LinköpingSweden

Personalised recommendations