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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 252–261 | Cite as

Undergraduate projects in mathematics

  • Keith Hirst
  • Norman Biggs
Article

Conclusion

We have claimed that project work introduces the student to a wide range of mathematical activities: critical reading, selection of material, mathematical exposition, talking about mathematics, formulation of problems, investigation of open problems, and so forth. It also encourages an active personal involvement in mathematics. Our aim in presenting this report has been to focus attention on some of the questions facing university mathematics teachers at this time, in the hope that others may be encouraged to seek their own answers.

Keywords

Open Problem Mathematics Teacher Critical Reading Mathematical Activity Project Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    In British Universities it is the rule that students are arranged in classes on the basis of their final examination results. The classes are called: First, Upper Second (properly, Second Class, Upper Division), Lower Second, Third, Pass. A high classification confers considerable status and financial advantages.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Hirst
    • 1
  • Norman Biggs
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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