European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 371–374 | Cite as

Cardiovascular, baroreflex and humoral responses in hypertensive patients during nicardipine therapy

  • P. Coruzzi
  • A. Biggi
  • L. Musiari
  • C. Ravanetti
  • A. Novarini
Short Communications

Summary

Cardiovascular, baroreflex and humoral responses were evaluated in 8 patients with essential hypertension during a control period and then after oral treatment for 5 days with nicardipine hydrochloride 60 mg/d, a calcium channel antagonist.

Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial cuff pressures fell after the treatment from 145.7, 98.6 and 114 mmHg control to 136.5, 86.1 and 102.9 mmHg. Heart rate increased from 71 to 78.7 beats/min indicating activation of the baroreflex control mechanism. Neurally mediated changes in the cardiovascular responses to an increase in carotid baroceptor activity and to dynamic exercise were not affected by the drug, nor was the renin-aldosterone system. Thus, a clinically dose of nicardipine significantly reduced mean arterial pressure, whilst preserving circulatory homeostasis.

Key words

nicardipine essential hypertension carotid baroreceptors dynamic exercise reflex responses renin-aldosterone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Coruzzi
    • 1
  • A. Biggi
    • 1
  • L. Musiari
    • 1
  • C. Ravanetti
    • 1
  • A. Novarini
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Semeiotica MedicaUniversity of ParmaItaly

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