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Conversion of phenol formaldehyde resin to glass-like carbon

Abstract

Glass-like carbons have been produced for many years by the careful carbonization of a variety of starting materials such as cellulose, phenol formaldehyde, polyfurfuryl alcohol, acetone furfuryldehyde and other suitable thermosetting resins. A number of publications have appeared in the literature concerning their characteristics and applications. However, little is known about the preparation procedure and its influence on the development of this form of carbon. The present paper incorporates the studies on the carbonization behaviour of a suitable phenol formaldehyde resin and on the optimization of the phenol to formaldehyde molar ratio in the resin, carried out with respect to the various physical characteristics of the resins and the resulting carbons. The implications of these studies have been disucussed in detail.

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Bhatia, G., Aggarwal, R.K., Malik, M. et al. Conversion of phenol formaldehyde resin to glass-like carbon. J Mater Sci 19, 1022–1028 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00540472

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Keywords

  • Polymer
  • Alcohol
  • Cellulose
  • Formaldehyde
  • Acetone