Advertisement

Theoretica chimica acta

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 151–165 | Cite as

An improved LCAO-MO-SCF π-electron method

II. Hydrocarbons and nitrogen and oxygen heterocycles
  • O. W. Adams
  • R. L. Miller
Commentationes

Abstract

Using the method of a previous paper a modified technique is used to calculate the core parameters for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The one-center core parameters H pp 0 , are identified with conventional atomic valence state ionization potentials. The two-center core parameters are given by the equation H pq 0 = (H pp 0 + H qq 0 )/2 (H pq − 0.0855 R pq + 0.24639) − n p (S pq /4)(γ pp γ + γ pq γ ) − n q (S pq /4) · (γ qq γ + γ pq γ ).

It is shown that these parameters, along with the electron repulsion integrals adopted earlier allow one to calculate with reasonable accuracy the singlet spectra and ionization potentials (within Koopmans' approximation) of a large number of unsaturated hydrocarbons as well as the heterocycles pyridine, p-benzoquinone (PBQ), pyrrole and furan.

Keywords

Pyrrole Furan Ionization Potential Carbone Unsaturated Hydrocarbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Zusammenfassung

Unter Benutzung einer früheren Methode wird ein modifiziertes Verfahren zur Berechnung der Rumpfparameter von C-, N- und O-Atomen vorgeschlagen. Die Einzentren-Rumpfparameter H pp 0 werden den üblichen Ionisationspotentialen für die atomaren Valenzzustände gleichgesetzt. Die Zweizentren-Rumpfparameter werden nach H pq 0 = (H pp 0 + H qq 0 )/2 (H pq − 0.0855 R pq + 0.24639) − n p (S pq /4)(γ pp γ + γ pq γ ) − n q (S pq /4) · (γ qq γ + γ pq γ ) berechnet.

Auf diese Weise und unter Verwendung der schon früher benützten Coulombintegrale lassen sich die Singulett-Spektren und Ionisationspotentiale einer großen Anzahl ungesättigter Kohlenwasserstoffe sowie der Heterocyclen Pyridin, p-Benzochinon, Pyrrol und Furan mit der üblichen Genauigkeit berechnen.

Résumé

Calcul des paramètres de coeur du carbone, de l'azote et de l'oxygène, en utilisant la méthode d'un article précédent techniquement modifiée. Les paramètres de coeur monocentriques H pp 0 sont identifiés avec les potentiels d'ionisation de l'état atomique de valence conventionnel. Les paramètres de coeur bicentriques sont donnée par l'équation H pq 0 = (H pp 0 + H qq 0 )/2 (H pq − 0.0855 R pq + 0.24639) − n p (S pq /4)(γ pp γ + γ pq γ ) − n q (S pq /4) · (γ qq γ + γ pq γ ). On montre que ces paramètres utilisés avec les intégrales de répulsion précédemment adoptées permettent de calculer avec une précision raisonnable le spectresingulet et les potentiels d'ionisation (dans l'approxirnation de Koopmans) pour un grand nombre d'hydrocarbures non saturés et des hétérocycles commee la pyridine, la p-benzoquinone (PBQ), le pyrrole et le furane.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Adams, O. W., and R. L. Miller: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 88, 404 (1966). Referred to here as Paper I.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Koopmans, T.: Physica 1, 104 (1933).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Löwdin, P. O.: J. chem. Physics 18, 365 (1950).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Goeppert-Mayer, M., and A. L. Sklar: J. chem. Physics 6, 645 (1948).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Nishimoto, K., and N. Mataga: Z. physik. Chem. (Frankfurt) 12, 335 (1957).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hinze, J., and H. H. Jaffé: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 84, 540 (1962).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Pariser, R.: J. chem. Physics 24, 250 (1956).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Shoemaker, V., and L. Pauling: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 1769 (1939).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Robertson, J. M., and I. Woodward: Proc. Roy. Soc. (London) A 162, 568 (1937).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hanson, A. W.: Acta crystallogr. 19, 19 (1965).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Robertson, J. M., H. M. M. Shearer, G. A. Sim, and D. G. Watson: Acta crystallogr. 15, 1 (1962); Pawley, G. S.: Acta crystallogr. 18, 560 (1965).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Nakajima, T., and S. Katagiri: Molecular Physics 7, 149 (1963).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bak, B., L. Hansen-Nygaard, and J. Rastrup-Andersen: J. molecular Spectroscopy 2, 361 (1958).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    —, D. Christiansen, L. Hansen, and J. Rastrup-Andersen: J. chem. Physics 24, 720 (1956).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    — — W. B. Dixon, L. Hansen-Nygaard, J. Rastrup-Andersen, and M. Schottländer: J. molecular Spectroscopy 9, 124 (1962).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Swingle, S. M.: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 76, 1409 (1954).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Jaffé, H. H., and M. Orchin: Theory and Applications of Ultraviolet Spectroscopy. New York: J. Wiley and Sons, Inc. 1962.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Beveridge, D. L., and H. H. Jaffé: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 87, 5340 (1965).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Platt, J. R.: J. chem. Physics 17, 484 (1949).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Klevens, H. B., and J. R. Platt: J. chem. Physics 17, 470 (1949).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Doering, W. E. von: Theoretical Organic Chemistry; Kekulé Symposium p. 35. London: Butterworths Scientific Publications 1959.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Nishimoto, K., and L. S. Forster: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 3, 407 (1965); — Forster, L. S.: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 5, 81 (1966).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Bloor, J. E., B. R. Gilson, and N. Brearley: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 8, 35 (1967).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Briegleb, G., and J. Czeckalla: Z. Electrochem. 63, 6 (1959).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Wachs, M. E., and V. H. Dibeler: J. chem. Physics 31, 1557 (1959).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    —: J. chem. Physics 41, 1661 (1964).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Van Brunt, R. J., and M. E. Wachs: J. chem. Physics 41, 3195 (1964).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Watanabe, K.: J. chem. Physics 26, 542 (1957).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Clark, L. B.: J. chem. Physics 43, 2566 (1965).Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Streitwieser, A.: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 82, 4123 (1960).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Petruska, J.: J. chem. Physics 34, 1120 (1961).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Stevenson, P. E.: J. molecular Spectroscopy 17, 58 (1965).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Brand, J. C. D., and T. H. Goodwin: Trans. Faraday Soc. 53, 295 (1957).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Pickett, L. W., M. E. Corning, G. M. Wieder, D. A. Semenow, and J. M. Buckley: J. Amer. chem. Soc. 75, 1618 (1953).Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Watanabe, K., and T. Nakayama: J. chem. Physics 29, 48 (1958).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Price, W. C., and A. D. Walsh: Proc. Roy. Soc. (London) A 179, 201 (1941).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Nishimoto, K., and L. S. Forster: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 4, 155 (1966).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Dahl, J. P., and A. E. Hansen: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 1, 199 (1963).Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Turner, D. W.: Advances Physical Org. Chem. 4, 31 (1966).Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Pujol, L., et A. Julg: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 2, 125 (1964).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Dewar, M. J. S., and G. J. Gleicher: J. chem. Physics 44, 759 (1966).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Hoffmann, R.: J. chem. Physics 39, 1397 (1963).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Baird, N. C., and M. J. S. Dewar: Theoret. chim. Acta (Berl.) 9, 1 (1967).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. W. Adams
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. L. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Organic Chemistry DepartmentResearch Division, Abott LaboratoriesNorth Chicago
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity of IllinoisChicago

Personalised recommendations