Internationales Archiv für Arbeitsmedizin

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 39–49 | Cite as

Trichloro-compounds in the urine of humans exposed to methyl chloroform at sub-threshold levels

  • Yukio Seki
  • Yukimasa Urashima
  • Hiroyuki Aikawa
  • Hiroshi Matsumura
  • Yoko Ichikawa
  • Fusako Hiratsuka
  • Yukari Yoshioka
  • Shinichiro Shimbo
  • Masayuki Ikeda
Article

Summary

Survey was carried out in 4 intaglio printing factories where methyl chloroform, the sole organic solvent in the entire process, was employed to remove excess ink. The medical interview and clinico-laboratory examinations revealed no dose-consistent adverse effects among the four groups of workers who had been exposed at the average concentrations of 4, 25, 28 and 53 ppm, respectively. Linear relationship was observed between environmental vapour concentrations and total trichloro-compounds levels in the urine of workers exposed. Increased levels of urinary metabolites towards the week-end, together with the biological half-life of 8.7 hrs as measured from the decrease in the urinary metabolites, suggested the storage of methyl chloroform in the body after repeated exposures. Perusal of previous reports as well as present results regarding toxic potency of methyl chloroform supports, with emphasis of possible accumulation, the German threshold of 200 ppm as a tentative value of choice for the time being.

Key words

Biological Half-Life Exposure Index Methyl Chloroform Threshold Limit Value Total Trichloro-Compounds Trichloroacetic Acid 1,1,1-Trichloroethane Trichloroethanol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukio Seki
    • 1
  • Yukimasa Urashima
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Aikawa
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Matsumura
    • 1
  • Yoko Ichikawa
    • 1
  • Fusako Hiratsuka
    • 1
  • Yukari Yoshioka
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Shimbo
    • 2
  • Masayuki Ikeda
    • 3
  1. 1.Occupational Health Service CenterTokyo
  2. 2.Department of MedicineKyoto University HospitalKyoto
  3. 3.Department of HygieneTohoku University School of MedicineSendai

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