Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 607–610 | Cite as

State of phosphorus in sorbents based on titanium and zirconium phosphates from 31P NMR spectroscopy data

  • S. B. Randarevich
  • V. V. Strelko
  • V. N. Belyakov
  • V. Yu. Korovin
  • A. I. Bortun
Brief Communications

Abstract

A 31P NMR method has been used to study sorbents based on titanium and zirconium phosphates synthesized by bulk mixing the reagents and treatment of x-ray amorphous TiO2, rutile and ZrO2 by phosphoric acid. In the bulk titanium and zirconium phosphates the phosphorus occurs in four different states, phosphate groups bonded through cross-linking oxygen atoms with one, two, and three atoms of the metal and molecules of phosphoric acid trapped in the matrix of the sorbent in the synthesis process. It is established that the method of grafting the phosphate groups to the surfaces of the hydrated TiO2 and ZrO2 is determined by the crystalline and chemical properties of the surfaces.

Keywords

TiO2 Titanium Phosphorus Oxygen Atom Rutile 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. B. Randarevich
    • 1
  • V. V. Strelko
    • 1
  • V. N. Belyakov
    • 1
  • V. Yu. Korovin
    • 1
  • A. I. Bortun
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of General and Inorganic ChemistryAcademy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSRKiev

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