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Histochemistry

, Volume 87, Issue 2, pp 123–128 | Cite as

Human specific anti-type IV collagen monoclonal antibodies, characterization and immunohistochemical application

  • M. G. Havenith
  • J. P. M. Cleutjens
  • C. Beek
  • E. v. d. Linden
  • A. F. P. M. De Goeij
  • F. T. Bosman
Article

Summary

This paper describes two new monoclonal antibodies reactive with human specific type IV collagen epitopes in frozen as well as routinely fixed and processed tissue sections. The antibodies (1042 and 1043) were raised against human placental type IV collagen and were shown by immunoblotting and ELISA tests to react exclusively with type IV collagen determinants. Extensive immunohistochemical survey studies on panels of tissues from various species, using unfixed cryosat sections, demonstrated that antibody 1042 reacted only with human type IV collagen whereas antibody 1043 in addition reacted with rabbit type IV collagen. All tissues showed homogeneous staining of the basement membrane, indicating that the detected epitopes did not show organ-specific distribution.

Tissue processing protocols for using these monoclonal antibodies on routinely processed paraffin embedded tissues were developed. It was found that whereas polyclonal antitype IV collagen antisera required pepsin digestion, our monoclonal antibodies required pronase or papain digestion to restore type IV collagen immunoreactivity in paraffin sections.

It is concluded that these monoclonal anti-type IV collagen antibodies detect species specific epitopes which can be detected in routinely processed paraffin embedded tissues after appropriate enzyme pretreatment.

Keywords

Monoclonal Antibody Papain ELISA Test Human Type Specific Epitope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. G. Havenith
    • 1
  • J. P. M. Cleutjens
    • 1
  • C. Beek
    • 1
  • E. v. d. Linden
    • 1
  • A. F. P. M. De Goeij
    • 1
  • F. T. Bosman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of LimburgMaastrichtThe Netherlands

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