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An economic approach to fertility in Britain since 1860

Abstract

This paper utilises a dynamic economic approach to examine movements in fertility in Britain since 1860. The analysis and results indicate that fertility has responded positively to changes in incomes. However, this positive effect has been more than offset by the increase in the opportunity cost of female time which has followed closely the education attainment of women.

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Additional information

An earlier version of this paper was presented to seminars at the Universities of Southampton and Hull, and the Hatfield Polytechnic. The authors would like to thank, without implementing, A. Cigno, G. Mizon and N. Rau for useful comments.

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Tzannatos, Z., Symons, J. An economic approach to fertility in Britain since 1860. J Popul Econ 2, 121–138 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00522405

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00522405

Keywords

  • Opportunity Cost
  • Economic Approach
  • Education Attainment
  • Female Time