Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 227–233 | Cite as

Perspectives on teaching computing in the humanities

  • Robert L. Oakman
Article

Keywords

Computational Linguistic Teaching Computing 

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REFERENCES

  1. Butler, C. (1985). Computing in Linguistics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  2. Conway, R., J. Archer (1979). Programming for Poets: A Gentle Introduction Using Pascal. Boston MA: Little, Brown.Google Scholar
  3. D'Ambrosio, B. (1985). “Expert Systems—Myth or Reality?” BYTE, January 1985, 275–282.Google Scholar
  4. Griswold, R., J.F. Poage, I.P. Polonsky (1971). The SNOBOL4 Programming Language. 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  5. Hockey, S. (1986). SNOBOL Programming for the Humanities. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Ide, N. (1987). Pascal for the Humanities. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  7. Oakman, R. L. (1972). “Computers in the Humanities,” Humanities in the South, No. 35 (Spring 1972), pp. 4, 10.Google Scholar

Software and database references Literature and Languages:

  1. CALICO Data Base, 3097 Jesse Knight Humanities Building, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602.Google Scholar
  2. Duke Language Toolkit, Humanities Computing Facility, Duke University, Durham NC 27706.Google Scholar
  3. EDIT!, Random House, 201 East 50th Street, New York NY 10022.Google Scholar
  4. ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, online data base available from DIALOG Information Services, 3460 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto CA 94303.Google Scholar
  5. FATRAS text analysis program, Paul Bratley, Computer Science, Université de Montréal, H3C 3J7, Montréal Canada.Google Scholar
  6. HBJ Writer, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth Avenue, San Diego CA 92101.Google Scholar
  7. London Stage Information Bank, Ben Schneider, Dept. of English, Lawrence University, Appleton WI 54912.Google Scholar
  8. MLA Bibliography, online database available from DIALOG Information Services, 3460 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto CA 94303.Google Scholar
  9. Nota Bene, Dragonfly Software, Modern Language Association, 10 Astor Place, New York NY 10003-6981.Google Scholar
  10. Oxford Concordance Program, Oxford Electronic Publishing, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, U.K.Google Scholar
  11. Tools for Writers, Kinko's Academic Courseware Exchange, 4141 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93110.Google Scholar
  12. URICA!, Robert L. Cannon, Dept. of Computer Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC 29208.Google Scholar
  13. WordCruncher, Humanities Research Center, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602.Google Scholar
  14. Writer's Workbench, Charles Smith, Dept. of English, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523.Google Scholar

History and Government:

  1. Balance of Power, Mindscape, 3444 Dundee Road, Northbrook IL 60022.Google Scholar
  2. Filevision, Telos Software, 3420 Ocean Park Boulevard, Santa Monica CA 90405-9990.Google Scholar
  3. Treaty of Versailles, Kinko's Academic Courseware Exchange, 4141 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93110.Google Scholar
  4. The Would-Be Gentleman, Kinko's Academic Courseware Exchange, 4141 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93110.Google Scholar

Geography, Music, and Art:

  1. For a variety of suggestions in these fields, see Willard McCarty, ed., Computers and the Humanities: Software Fair Guide (University of Toronto; Center for Computing in the Humanities, 1986); Kinko's Academic Courseware Exchange, 4141 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93110.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Paradigm Press, Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Oakman
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South CarolinaUSA

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