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Sulfite ion sensor with use of immobilized organelle

  • Isao Karube
  • Shigekazu Sogabe
  • Tadashi Matsunaga
  • Schuchi Suzuki
Biotechnology

Summary

The sulfite ion sensor consisted of immobilized microsomes and an oxygen electrode. When the sensor was inserted into the sample solution, a steady-state current was obtained within 10 min. A linear relationship was obtained between the steadystate current and the sulfite ion concentration when this was less than 3.4×10−4 mol×l−1. The principle and future application of the sensor are also discussed.

Keywords

Oxygen Linear Relationship Sample Solution Sulfite Future Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isao Karube
    • 1
  • Shigekazu Sogabe
    • 1
  • Tadashi Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Schuchi Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Laboratory of Resources UtilizationTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan

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