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Therapeutic doses of erythromycin esteolate is not cholestatic in rats in vivo

  • I. Fiebiger
  • M. S. Anwer
  • D. Hegner
Article

Summary

The effect of erythromycin esteolate (EE) on bile flow and bile acid secretion was studied in male Wistar rats in vivo. Daily oral treatment with a dose of up to 100 mg/kg for 1 week increased the bile flow and the bile acid secretion. Increasing the days of treatment to 4 weeks with a dose of 20 mg/kg did not alter the measured parameters significantly. Acute intravenous injection of erythromycin lactobionate (50 mg/kg) also increased bile flow and biliary bile acid secretion temporarily. The increase in bile flow may partly be due to the osmotic effect of the drug and its metabolites in bile. Since EE failed to produce cholestasis in the range of therapeutic doses, rats do not seem to be a suitable experimental model for studying EE-cholestasis.

Key words

Erythromycin esteolate Bile flow Bile acid secretion 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Fiebiger
    • 1
  • M. S. Anwer
    • 1
  • D. Hegner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Pharmakologie, Toxikologie und PharmazieFachbereich Tiermedizin der Universität MünchenMünchen 22Germany

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