Physiology of α-amylase production by immobilized Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

  • Atsuhiko Shinmyo
  • Hiroyuki Kimura
  • Hirosuke Okada
Biotechnology

Summary

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 321S cells were immobilized with 3.4% κ-carrageenan gel in bead form, and α-amylase production by the immobilized cells was studied. Cells in the gel, after the population reached maximum were restricted to a layer of 50 μm thickness, from the surface of the gel, suggesting that oxygen diffusion is the growth limiting factor. The specific respiratory activity and the growth rate of the entrapped cells under such conditions were 1/2 and 1/5 ∼1/10, respectively, that of free cells. In spite of the repressed respiration and growth, the specific rate of α-amylase production of the entrapped cells reached the maximum value of free cells or higher.

In continuous culture, in an aerated vessel with a volume ratio of gel beads to medium of 1:2, the maximum production rate of α-amylase was obtained at a dilution rate of 1.0 h−1, which was double the maximum specific growth rate of the strain.

These results showed that bacterial α-amylase production, which is a nongrowth-associated type of synthesis was achieved with the use of immobilized cells.

Keywords

Respiration Bacillus Specific Growth Rate Dilution Rate Immobilize Cell 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Kinoshita S, Okada H, Terui G (1968) On the nature of α-amylase forming system in Bacillus subtilis. J Ferment Technol 46:427–436Google Scholar
  2. Kobubu T, Karube I, Suzuki S (1978) α-Amylase production by immobilized whole cells of Bacillus subtilis. Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 5:233–240Google Scholar
  3. Morikawa Y, Karube I, Suzuki S (1980) Continuous production of bacitracin by immobilized living whole cells of Bacillus sp. Biotechnol Bioeng 22:1015–1023Google Scholar
  4. Semets EV, Glenn AR, May BK, Elliot WH (1973) Accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid specific for extracellular protease in Bacillus subtilis 168. J Bacteriol 116:531–534Google Scholar
  5. Takata I, Yamamoto K, Tosa T, Chibata I (1979) Screening of microorganisms having high fumarase activity and their immobilization with carrageenan. Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 7:161–172Google Scholar
  6. Wada M, Kato J, Chibata I (1980a) Continuous production of ethanol using immobilized growing yeast cells. Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 10:275–287Google Scholar
  7. Wada M, Uchida T, Kato J, Chibata I (1980b) Continuous production of L-isoleucine using immobilized growing Serratia marcescens cells. Biotechnol Bioeng, 22:1175–1188Google Scholar
  8. Wada M, Kato J, Chibata I (1981) Continuous production of ethanol in high concentration using immobilized growing yeast cells Eur J Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 11:67–71Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsuhiko Shinmyo
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Kimura
    • 1
  • Hirosuke Okada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Fermentation TechnologyOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations