Advertisement

Virchows Archiv A

, Volume 377, Issue 4, pp 277–285 | Cite as

The eosinophilic fibrohistiocytic lesion of the bone marrow

A mastocellular lesion in bone disease
  • J. te Velde
  • F. J. F. E. Vismans
  • L. Leenheers-Binnendijk
  • C. J. Vos
  • D. Smeenk
  • O. L. M. Bijvoet
Article

Summary

Seven patients are described, six with severe osteoporosis and the seventh with osteogenesis imperfecta with moderate osteoporosis. The iliac bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens of all seven showed peculiar infiltrates consisting of elongated mast cells, eosinophils, plasma cells, and varying numbers of lymphocytes. Only one patient exhibited signs of allergy with urticaria pigmentosa; the other six patients had no abnormalities that could be related to a known mast cell disease. The lesions described here are the same as those described in five patients by Rywlin as “eosinophilic fibrohistiocytic lesion in the bone marrow”. However, in our methacrylate sections the fibrohistiocytes are shown to be mast cells. Although a relationship with drug hypersensitivity is disputed, the presence of the mast cells and eosinophils suggests an allergic condition.

Key words

Eosinophils Mast cells Osteoporosis Allergy Bone marrow histology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Austen, K.F., Orange, R.P.: Bronchial asthma: the possible role of the chemical mediators of immediate hypersensitivity in the pathogenesis of subacute chronic disease. Am. Rev. Resp. Dis. 112, 423 (1975)Google Scholar
  2. Burkhardt, R.: Diagnose und Therapie der Osteoporose. Münchener Med. Wschr. 43, 1915 (1973)Google Scholar
  3. Frame, B., Nixon, R.K.: Bone marrow mast cells in osteoporosis of aging. New Engl. J. Med. 279, 626–639 (1968)Google Scholar
  4. Hennekheuser, H.H.: Histochemischer Nachweis von Naphthol-AS-D-Chloro-Acetat Esterase an Methacrylat-Schnitten. Klin. Wschr. 50, 213 (1972)Google Scholar
  5. Kruse, H.P., Kuhlencordt, F., Wernecke, U.: Die Bedeutung der Mastzellen im Knochenmark bei der Osteoporose. Deutsche Med. Wschr. 50, 2388–2391 (1973)Google Scholar
  6. Mutter, R.D., Tannenbaum, M., Ultmann, J.E.: Systemic mast cell disease. Ann. Int. Med. 59, 887–906 (1963)Google Scholar
  7. Peart, K.M., Ellis, H.A.: Quantitative observations on iliac bone marrow mast cells in chronic renal failure. J. Clin. Path. 28, 947–955 (1975)Google Scholar
  8. Rywlin, A.M., Hoffman, E.P., Ortega, R.S.: Eosinophilic fibrohistiocytic lesion of bone marrow: a distinctive new morfologic finding, probably related to drug hypersensitivity. Blood 40, 464–472 (1972)Google Scholar
  9. Rywlin, A.M. Histopathology of the bone marrow. pp. 174–177. Boston: Little, Brown and Co. 1976Google Scholar
  10. Udoji, W.C., Razavi, S.A.: Mast cells and myelofibrosis. Am. J. Clin. Path. 63, 203–209 (1975)Google Scholar
  11. Velde, J. te, Burkhardt, R., Kleiverda, K., Leenheers-Binnendijk, L. & Sommerfeit, W. Methylmethacrylate in histopathology. Histopathology 1, 319–330 (1977)Google Scholar
  12. Wasserman, S.E. The primary chemical mediators of immediate hypersensitivity: chemical and functional characterisation and biochemical events in their generation and release. In: The mast cell in relation to allergic mehanisms. Pages 28–32 and 35–36. Daems et al. eds. Leusden: The Netherlands Asthma Foundation 1977Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. te Velde
    • 1
  • F. J. F. E. Vismans
    • 1
  • L. Leenheers-Binnendijk
    • 1
  • C. J. Vos
    • 1
  • D. Smeenk
    • 1
  • O. L. M. Bijvoet
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology and EndocrinologyUniversity Medical CentreLeidenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations