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Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 17, Issue 11–12, pp 1121–1129 | Cite as

Serum esterase genetics: Identification and hormone induction of the Es-1b esterase in inbred rats

  • Kozo Matsumoto
  • Bunei Syuto
  • Yoh-Ichi Miyake
  • Akira Matsuhashi
  • Miki Aizawa
Article

Abstract

A previously unrecognized esterase from the sera of the appropriate strains of the rat Rattus norvegicus was revealed by a discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic technique. This esterase migrated in the albumin region, whereas a previously known major albumin esterase controlled by the Es-2 locus migrated in the postalbumin region when the method was used. The new albumin esterase component which separated from the Es-2 esterase was identified as the product of the Es-1b gene. The new albumin esterase was not detectable in the sera of sexually mature males of the appropriate genotype, because the activity level of this esterase was influenced by sex hormones, especially androgen.

Key words

Es-1b esterase age and sex influence serum Rattus norvegicus 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kozo Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Bunei Syuto
    • 2
  • Yoh-Ichi Miyake
    • 3
  • Akira Matsuhashi
    • 1
  • Miki Aizawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Animal ExperimentHokkaido University, School of MedicineSapporoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Obstetrics, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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