Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 24, Issue 1–2, pp 71–78 | Cite as

Characteristics of site variation among clones of the 340-base pair, tandemly repeated EcoR1 family of human DNA

  • N. Burr Furlong
  • Koenraad Marien
  • Ben Flook
  • Jim White
Article
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

Twenty-four clones of EcoR1-restricted, 340-base pair (bp) DNA derived from human DNA have been sequenced and compared to a published consensus sequence for this family. No two clones were found to have identical sequences; the clones studied differed from the consensus sequence in as few as 1 or as many as 41 sites. On the average in these clones, a 5.2% divergence from exact homology was found, with 1 of 10 of the site variations being “nonrandom,” i.e., cases in which five or more clones had the same nucleotide substitution at that site (viz., 53, 124, 126, 138, 152, and 157). At site 157, for example, 16 of the 24 clones differed from the reference sequence. Positions and their respective changes, as compared to the consensus sequence, are summarized. Variations are discussed with relation to possible functions for these sequences.

Key words

human DNA: alphoid sequence tandem repeats nucleosomes EcoR1 restriction 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Burr Furlong
    • 1
  • Koenraad Marien
    • 1
  • Ben Flook
    • 1
  • Jim White
    • 1
  1. 1.The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biochemistry System Cancer CenterThe University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston

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