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Recovery of uranium by immobilized microorganisms

  • Akira Nakajima
  • Takao Horikoshi
  • Takashi Sakaguchi
Biotechnology

Summary

Some attempts were made to recover uranium from sea and fresh water using immobilized Streptomyces viridochromogenes and Chlorella regularis cells. The cells immobilized in polyacrylamide gel have the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high adsorption ability, good mechanical properties, and applicability in a column system. The adsorption of uranium by the immobilized cells is not affected by the pH values between 4 and 9. These results show that uranium adsorption becomes independent of pH after immobilization. The amounts of uranium adsorbed by the immobilized cells increased linearly with temperature, suggesting that the adsorption of uranium by the immobilized cells is an endothermic reaction. The immobilized cells can recover uranium almost quantitatively from both fresh and sea water containing uranium, and almost all uranium adsorbed is desorbed with a solution of Na2CO3. Thus the immobilized cells of Streptomyces and Chlorella can be used repeatedly in adsorption-desorption process.

Keywords

Uranium Immobilization Streptomyces Fresh Water Chlorella 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Nakajima
    • 1
  • Takao Horikoshi
    • 1
  • Takashi Sakaguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryMiyazaki Medical CollegeKiyotake, MiyazakiJapan

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