Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology

, Volume 315, Issue 3, pp 233–239 | Cite as

Determination of plasma catecholamines by means of radioenzymatic labelling and high pressure liquid chromatographic separation

  • Eva Appel
  • Peter Bayer
  • Paul Hajdú
  • Dieter Palm
  • Joachim Schofer
  • Michael Uihlein
Article

Summary

0.05 ml plasma samples are incubated with 3H-S-adenosylmethionine and catechol-O-methyl-transferase. The resulting methoxy derivatives are extracted, the extracts separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and the metanephrine fractions collected. Evaluation is performed by liquid scintillation counting of radioactivity in the respective fractions. The following performance criteria are presented: precision, accuracy, detectability (40 pg/ml for adrenaline and noradrenaline, 130 pg/ml for dopamine), linearity and day-by-day variation. Comparison with a standard method shows an excellent correlation for adrenaline and noradrenaline.

Key words

Plasma catecholamines HPLC separation Enzymatic labelling Performance characteristics Comparison of methods 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Appel
    • 1
  • Peter Bayer
    • 1
  • Paul Hajdú
    • 2
  • Dieter Palm
    • 1
  • Joachim Schofer
    • 1
  • Michael Uihlein
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyKlinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt/MainGermany
  2. 2.Hoechst AktiengesellschaftFrankfurt 80Germany

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