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Histochemistry

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 275–282 | Cite as

Electron microscopic demonstration of cell surface carbohydrates by means of peroxidase and ferritin complexes of the Lens culinaris lection

  • J. Roth
  • K. Thoss
  • M. Wagner
  • H. W. Meyer
Article

Summary

The use of Lens culinaris lectin for electron microscopic detection of D-mannose, D-glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine like sites on tumor cells, erythrocytes, erythrocyte ghosts, cultured rat liver cells and various tissues of mice is demonstrated. In addition to Lens culinaris lectin-peroxidase reaction (LcL-po reaction) the preparation of active Lens culinaris lectin-ferritin conjugate are described and the specificity of cytochemical reactions are demonstrated. Furthermore experiments by immuno freeze-etching are reported for topological analysis of the lectin receptors.

Keywords

Ferritin Topological Analysis Lens Culinaris Erythrocyte Ghost Microscopic Detection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Roth
    • 1
  • K. Thoss
    • 1
  • M. Wagner
    • 2
  • H. W. Meyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PathologyFriedrich-Schiller-UniversityJenaGerman Democratic Republic
  2. 2.Research Centre of Molecular Biology and Medicine, Central Institute of Microbiology and Experimental TherapyAcademy of Sciences of the GDRJenaGerman Democratic Republic

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