Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology

, Volume 296, Issue 3, pp 297–300 | Cite as

Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes mescaline demethylase activity of brain-cortex soluble supernatant

  • R. K. Datta
  • J. J. Ghosh
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Summary

Brain-cortex slices demethylate mescaline and p-methoxyacetanilide, a reference O-demethylating substrate, though the rate of demethylation of mescaline is about one third that of the reference substrate. The demethylase activity is localized mostly in the soluble supernatant (105000xg). It is purified 47-fold with respect to the demethylation of mescaline by ammonium sulfate precipitation and DEAE cellulose chromatography. The partially purified demethylase, which is stable for 3–5 days at −5° C in the presence of dithiothreitol and glutathione and is inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, has maximal activity at pH between 7.2 and 8.0. It demethylates mescaline into 3,4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxyphenethylamine and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenethylamine and some unidentified derivatives.

Key words

Brain-cortex slices O-demethylase Mescaline Soluble supernatant 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. K. Datta
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. J. Ghosh
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyBeth Israel Medical CenterNew York
  2. 2.Department of PathologyMount Sinai School of Medicine of The City University of New YorkNew YorkU.S.A.
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry of Calcutta UniversityCalcuttaIndia

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