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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 133, Issue 3, pp 193–199 | Cite as

Rational usage of therapeutic drug monitoring in antiepileptic treatment

  • H. Bartels
Review

Conclusions

The availability of anticonvulsant drug level monitoring in body fluids has appreciably improved the treatment of epilepsy, but to obtain maximum benefits from the method both pharmacological insight and clinical experience are required. Much work is still to be done, correlating clinical observations and drug levels to a background of pharmacokinetic principles, as well as minimizing analytical errors so that the monitoring of anticonvulsant levels can achieve its maximum potential in improving the management of individual patients with epilepsy.

Key words

Drug monitoring Antiepileptic treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Bartels
    • 1
  1. 1.BremenFederal Republic of Germany

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