Apomorphine contracts and relaxes circular smooth muscle of guinea-pig stomach via action on adrenoceptor mechanisms

  • Brenda Costall
  • Simon J. Gunning
  • Robert J. Naylor
Article

Summary

Nanomolar concentrations of apomorphine caused contractions of the circular smooth muscle from the body region of the guinea-pig stomach, the response showing rapid tachyphylaxis. These contractions were antagonised by yohimbine but not by prazosin, haloperidol, propranolol or methysergide. Higher concentrations of apomorphine caused concentration-related relaxations of the stomach body which were not subject to tachyphylaxis. These were antagonised by propranolol but not by prazosin, yohimbine or haloperidol. Dopamine-induced contractions of the circular smooth muscle from the stomach body were antagonised by apomorphine in nanomolar concentration; acetylcholine-induced contractions and isoprenaline-, dopamine- and phenylephrine-induced relaxations were unaffected by apomorphine. Thus, it is concluded that the contraction of circular smooth muscle from the stomach body to apomorphine is mediated via an adrenoceptor with characteristics of the α2-type, and that a partial agonist-antagonists action prevents subsequent contractile responses to apomorphine and dopamine. Relaxation caused only at higher concentrations of apomorphine is mediated via an adrenoceptor with characteristics of the β-type.

Key words

Apomorphine Dopamine Stomach musculature α2-Adrenoceptors β-Adrenoceptors 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brenda Costall
    • 1
  • Simon J. Gunning
    • 1
  • Robert J. Naylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Postgraduate School of Studies in PharmacologyUniversity of BradfordBradfordUK

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