Advertisement

Histochemistry

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 111–124 | Cite as

Factors affecting the estimation of the relative amount of chromophore and chromophore area by the two-wavelength method of patau and ornstein

  • Patrick Van Oostveldt
  • Guido Boeken
Article

Summary

Factors influencing the calculation of the relative amount of chromophore and the chromophore area by the two-wavelength method are examined. The study was carried out with the help of models and further tested on Feulgen stained preparations. Except for certain restrictions the difference between the chromophore area as calculated from the two transmissions measurements and the chromophore area obtained by planimetry can be used as a guide for determining the proper measuring conditions, including the choise of the two wavelengths.

Keywords

Public Health Measuring Condition Transmission Measurement Proper Measuring 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Garcia, A. M.: Studies on DNA in leucocytes and related cells of mammals. II. On the Feulgen reaction and two-wavelength microspectrophotometry. Histochemie 3, 178–194 (1962)Google Scholar
  2. Garcia, A. M., Ioro, R.: Potential sources of error in two-wavelength cytophotometry. In: Introduction to quantitative cytochemistry (Ed. G. L. Wied), Vol. 1, p. 215–237. New York, London: Academic Press, 1966Google Scholar
  3. Graumann, W.: Zur Standardisierung der Schiffschen Reagens. Z. Wissenschaftl. Mikrosk. 61, 225–226 (1952)Google Scholar
  4. Gottlieb-Rozenkranz, P., O'Brien, R.: A cytophotometric study of the deoxyribonucleic acid feulgen dye contents and area of human granulocytes and lymphocytes. J. Histochem. Cytochem. 19, 232–243 (1971)Google Scholar
  5. Mendelsohn, M. L.: The two-wavelength method of microspectrophotometry. II. A set of tables to facilitate the calculation. J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol. 4, 415–424 (1958)Google Scholar
  6. Mendelsohn, M. L.: The two-wavelength method of microspectrophotometry. IV. A new solution. J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol. 11, 509–513 (1961)Google Scholar
  7. Ornstein, L.: The distributional error in microspectrophotometry. Lab. Invest. 1, 250–265 (1952)Google Scholar
  8. Patau, K.: Absorption microspectrophotometry of irregular shaped objects. Chromosoma 5, 341–362 (1952)Google Scholar
  9. Rasch, E.M.: Two-wavelength cytophotometry of Sciara Salivary gland chromosomes. In: Introduction to quantitative cytochemistry (ed. Wied, G. L., Bahr, G. F.), Vol. 2, p. 335–355. New York, London: Academic Press 1970Google Scholar
  10. Rasch, E. M., Rasch, R. W.: Special applications of two-wavelength cytophotometry in biological systems. In: Introduction to quantitative cytochemistry (ed. Wied, G.L., Bahr, G.F.), Vol. 2, p. 297–333. New York, London: Academic Press 1970Google Scholar
  11. Van Oostveldt, P., Van Parijs, R.: Effect of light on nucleic Acid Synthesis and Polyploidy Level in Elongating Epicotyl Cells of Pisum sativum. Planta (Berl.) 124, 387–295 (1975)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Van Oostveldt
    • 1
  • Guido Boeken
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemistry and Laboratory of Plant PhysiologyState University K.L.GentBelgium

Personalised recommendations