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Clinical interpretation: The hermeneutics of medicine

Abstract

I argue that clinical medicine can best be understood not as a purified science but as a hermeneutical enterprise: that is, as involved with the interpretation of texts. The literary critic reading a novel, the judge asked to apply a law, must arrive at a coherent reading of their respective texts. Similarly, the physician interprets the ‘text’ of the ill person: clinical signs and symptoms are read to ferret out their meaning, the underlying disease. However, I suggest that the hermeneutics of medicine is rendered uniquely complex by its wide variety of textual forms. I discuss four in turn: the “experiential text” of illness as lived out by the patient; the “narrative text” constituted during history-taking; the “physical text” of the patient's body as objectively examined; the “instrumental text” constructed by diagnostic technologies. I further suggest that certain flaws in modern medicine arise from its refusal of a hermeneutic self-understanding. In seeking to escape all interpretive subjectivity, medicine has threatened to expunge its primary subject — the living, experiencing patient.

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Leder, D. Clinical interpretation: The hermeneutics of medicine. Theor Med Bioeth 11, 9–24 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00489234

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00489234

Key words

  • clinical interpretation
  • embodiment
  • hermeneutics
  • history of medicine