Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 243–251 | Cite as

Evidence for nonrandom multiplicity of gene products in 22 plant genera

  • Charles F. Sing
  • George J. Brewer
Article

Abstract

Correlations in the number (multiplicity) of molecular forms among 10 enzymes have been estimated from a sample of plants representing 22 genera. Significant correlations in multiplicity among some of the 10 enzyme systems suggest a nonrandom organization of variation in number of molecular forms. An analysis of the correlations among enzymes of a glycolytic and Krebs cycle subset supports the occurrence of patterns of influence on multiplicity which correspond to the known metabolic relatedness of the enzymes. We interpret these data as evidence for organization of enzyme multiplicity. This property may be of adaptive value to the species.

Keywords

Gene Product Enzyme System Plant Genus Molecular Form Krebs Cycle 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles F. Sing
    • 1
  • George J. Brewer
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Human Genetics and Medicine (Simpson Memorial Institute)University of Michigan Medical SchoolAnn Arbor

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