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Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 19, Issue 11–12, pp 1169–1182 | Cite as

Genetic variation among laboratory strains of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata

  • Margaret Mulvey
  • Robert C. Vrijenhoek
Article

Abstract

Isozymes of laboratory strains of Biomphalaria glabrata have been studied by starch gel electrophoresis. Methods are outlined for adaptation of this technique to the genetic study of these snails. Twenty-eight presumptive gene loci have been identified. Twelve invariant enzymes were observed. Sixteen loci displayed some polymorphism within or among the strains. These polymorphisms were generally widespread among strains from Brazil, Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, and the Dominican Republic. A high degree of intrastrain polymorphism was noted even in some presumably inbred laboratory strains. Crosses between strains were used to demonstrate the genetic basis for the patterns observed at 9 of the 16 polymorphic loci.

Key words

Biomphalaria glabrata polymorphism genetics snails 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Mulvey
    • 1
  • Robert C. Vrijenhoek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoology and Bureau of Biological ResearchRutgers UniversityNew Brunswick

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