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Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 77, Issue 3–4, pp 457–468 | Cite as

Best management practices for forested wetlands in the Southern Appalachian Region

  • W. Michael Aust
Part V Managed Wetlands

Abstract

Forestry best management practices (BMPs) have been developed for all of the states included in the Southern Appalachian Region (Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia). All of the state forestry BMPs were developed to reduce nonpoint source pollution from forestry operations. However, the states have developed BMPs that differ substantially with regard to methodology, particularly for forested wetlands. The state BMP guidelines vary in several major areas, including wetland types, BMP manual detail, streamside management zones, harvesting operations, site preparation operations, regeneration systems, road construction, and timber removal activities. An understanding of the similarities and differences between the state BMP guidelines will allow the forested wetland manager to comply with or improve upon existing forestry BMPs for wetlands.

Keywords

Management Practice Timber Nonpoint Source Road Construction Wetland Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Michael Aust
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ForestryVirginia Polytechnic Institute & State UniversityBlacksburg

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