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Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 64, Issue 1–2, pp 197–212 | Cite as

The potential role of temperate forests as sinks for CO2 — Examples from the german environmental policy against global warming

  • H. D. Gregor
Part III Managing Natural Sinks of CO2

Abstract

Among industrialized nations Germany ranks fourth in CO2 emissions. Most of these originate from the use of fossil fuels. Based on reports of a parliamentary study commission, established in 1987, and other expert groups in Germany this article adresses possible environmental effects of increasing atmospheric CO2, the sink potential of temperate forests and the influence of forest damage on this potential. A strategy for a 25 to 30% or 250 to 300×106 t yr−1 CO2 emissions reduction by 2005 (which Germany has itself committed to) is described in which measures to enhance C sequestration by forests play an important role. Expansion of forest area, a further increase of C storage by appropriate management and the restoration and protection of forest health impaired by air pollution would result in an additional storage of 17 to 20×106 t yr−1 of CO2, equaling 6 to 8% of the reduction target.

Keywords

Potential Role Fossil Fuel Global Warming Environmental Effect Forest Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. D. Gregor
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Environmental Agency (Umweltbundesamt)Berlin 33Germany

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