Archives of oto-rhino-laryngology

, Volume 233, Issue 2, pp 189–199 | Cite as

The influence of ototoxic drugs on brainstem auditory evoked potentials in man

  • J. -M. Guerit
  • P. Mahieu
  • S. Houben-Giurgea
  • S. Herbay
Article

Summary

To examine the short- and long-term consequences of ototoxic drug administration, the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) have been recorded in patients undergoing treatment with aminoglycosides antibiotics. It appears that the rapidity of the i.v. injection influences the short-term consequences of the drug administration. The long-term consequences may be reversible. Their reversibility could depend on the status of the ear before the first injection of ototoxic drug. In conclusion, BAEP may be useful as a means of atraumatic monitoring of the auditory function of patients treated with aminoglycosides antibiotics, the non-invasive character of this technique allowing it to be repeatedly used in both adult and young patients.

Key words

Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) Ototoxic drugs Sensorineural hearing loss 

Der Einfluß ototoxischer Substanzen auf die akustischen Hirnstammpotentiale des Menschen

Zusammenfassung

Applikation von Aminoglykosidantibiotika und Registrierung der akustischen Hirnstammpotentiale. Das atraumatische Verfahren ist bei Patienten jeden Alters zur Kontrolle des Gehörs bei Gabe ototoxischer Substanzen gut geeignet.

Schlüsselwörter

Akustische Hirnstammpotentiale Ototoxische Substanzen Sensorineuraler Hörverlust 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. -M. Guerit
    • 1
  • P. Mahieu
    • 1
  • S. Houben-Giurgea
    • 1
  • S. Herbay
    • 1
  1. 1.Unité d'Explorations Electrophysiologiques du Système Nerveux CentralCliniques Universitaires Saint-LucBrusselsBelgium

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