Mycopathologia

, Volume 92, Issue 1, pp 3–6 | Cite as

Effect of phytate on aflatoxin formation by Aspergillus parasiticus grown on different grains

  • K. Ehrlich
  • A. Ciegler
Article

Abstract

Aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus on corn, soybean, and cottonseed in the absence or presence of added sodium phytate was examined. No variation in aflatoxin concentrations was found in raw, chemically sterilized, or autoclaved soybeans whereas a five-fold reduction in total aflatoxins was found in cottonseed after addition of 330 μg sodium phytate to 10 g of autoclaved material. However, phytate did not affect aflatoxin production on non-sterile cottonseeds, although in corn a slight inhibition was found. Extraction of raw soybeans with hexane allowed production of 20-fold more aflatoxins, but levels were still lower than those found on rice or corn. Part of this relative inhibition in soybeans may arise from a heat-unstable, polar solvent-soluble, dialyzable factor present in soybeans. Our results support the conclusion that phytate is not the factor in soy responsible for its relative resistance to aflatoxin formation.

Keywords

Sodium Corn Hexane Aspergillus Aflatoxin 

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ehrlich
    • 1
  • A. Ciegler
    • 1
  1. 1.Southern Regional Research CenterNew OrleansUSA

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