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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 137, Issue 1, pp 35–39 | Cite as

Occurrence of four types of growth hormone-related dwarfism in Israeli communities

  • A. Adam
  • Z. Josefsberg
  • A. Pertzelan
  • Z. Zadik
  • J. M. Chemke
  • Z. Laron
Original Investigations

Abstract

Data are presented on 121 dwarfed patients belonging to 98 Israeli families with 4 types of dwarfism related to deficiency or in activity of human growth hormone (hGH): isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), partial hGH deficiency (pIGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) and Larontype dwarfism (LTD). These series are believed to comprise most of the dwarfs of these types in Israel; however, their distribution among the various ethnic communities varies greatly: LTD (15 families) is confined to a few communities of Oriental Jews; only 3 of 30 families with IGHD, but 7 of 10 families with pIGHD, are Ashkenazi, whereas the ethnic distribution of 42 families with MPHD corresponds roughly to that of the general population. These data seem to reflect the role of genetic factors in the etiology of the various types of dwarfism: the stronger the genetic component, the greater is its deviation from random occurrence among the various communities.

Key words

Dwarfism Growth hormone Isolated growth hormone deficiency Multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies Laron-type dwarfism Israeli populations 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Adam
    • 1
  • Z. Josefsberg
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Pertzelan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Z. Zadik
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. M. Chemke
    • 4
  • Z. Laron
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Everyman's University and Department of Human Genetics, Sackler School of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  2. 2.Institute of Pediatric and Adolescent EndocrinologyBeilinson Medical CenterPetah Tikva
  3. 3.Sackler School of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  4. 4.Clinical Genetics UnitKaplan HospitalRehovotIsrael

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